Towson University

you are watching: Towson University here hiddentracks.org
Towson University

PHYS211-101, -102


Towson University
Department of Physics, Astronomy, and Geosciences


Fall 2021

Lectures: PHYS211-101, -102

Wednesday, 7:00 p.m. – 9:45 p.m.

Sergei Zverev

Room SC 2230
Labs:      PHYS211-101

Monday, 7:00 p.m. 9:45 p.m.

Azriel Weinreb

Room SC 1323
Labs:      PHYS211-102

Tuesday, 7:00 p.m. – 9:45 p.m.

Room SC 1323

Course Description: PHYS
211-212 General Physics I, II algebra-based course
for Arts and Sciences,
Biology and Geosciences majors: mechanics, heat, light, electricity, magnetism,
and a brief introduction to modern physics.  Three lecture units and one
three-unit laboratory period; 
one
three-hour lecture and one three-hour laboratory period. PHYS 211 is the first
semester of a two-semester sequence in General Physics.

Required Text: College Physics , by Jerry G. Wilson, Anthony J. Buffa and Bo Lou, 7th edition, ISBN: 978-0-321-60183-4. If you have the 6th edition of this book, you can use it.
Additional resource: College Physics (openstax.org)

Mathematics prerequisites:


MATH 115 (or good standing in high school algebra (Algebra 2) and Trigonometry,
and scientific notation. Functions and equations: linear, quadratic,
exponential, and trigonometric.

Attendance: Students learn more in class than can be
measured by a few examinations. Therefore, attendance is a crucial factor in
evaluation. The very least you can get from the lectures are the material which
the instructor emphasizes – it will most likely appear on tests.

You are responsible for attending all lab and lecture sessions for your section, and for checking in with me in order to make up any missed work. If you must miss any sessions due to university related events or religious holidays, please email me to let me know two weeks before you miss class.
Attendance throughout the semester is required and no makeup work is permitted for unexcused absences. If a student misses an assignment because of an unexcused absence a grade of zero will be assessed. An excused absence is one which meets the university policies (see below). The student is responsible for all missed work. For every unexcused absence I will take off one point from the final cumulative score.

Towson University Policy on Class Attendance – It is policy of the University to excuse the absences of students for the following reasons:

· illness or injury when the student is unable to attend class;

· religious observance where the nature of the observance prevents the student
from attending class;

· participation in University activities at the request of University authorities (e.g.,
Intercollegiate Athletics, Forensics Team, Dance Company, etc.);

· compelling verifiable circumstances beyond the control of the student.

Students requesting an excused absence must provide documentation to the instructor two
weeks prior to the scheduled absence when known in advance, and as soon as possible
when not known in advance.

Masking protocols: Temporary COVID-19 Masking Protocols | Towson University

Lecture: For each lecture there will be a reading
assignment, which I recommend should be completed before coming to class. Since
the lectures will not be a complete and straight presentation of the material in
the text, these reading assignments are very important. The lectures will be
used to cover the most difficult parts of the reading in more detail or will
discuss them from a slightly different point of view*.

Lab is mandatory. Lab Manual for PHYS 211 for life science by Schaefer and Oldak. Follow the requirements in the lab manual. Bring to all sessions a calculator. Lab grades are provided by the Lab Instructor on the scale 0% – 100%. The tentative laboratory schedule is shown

below.The $10.00 lab fee may be used to purchase materials needed for in class activities and activities. For more information about your lab schedule, requirements and grading system contact your lab instructor.

Materials: Scientific Calculator, flash drive for storing data and class materials, binder or several spiral bound notebooks for keeping track of class notes, homework, lab.


Homework
will be assigned for each chapter (see the table
below). The problem sets are one of the best ways to learn the material and
prepare yourself for the examinations. The more examples and problems that you
do, the sooner you will understand the concepts. Before you start working on
assigned problems, work on examples. Try to solve the problems without looking
at the text. You are encouraged to work with each other on the assignments.
Learning problem solving skills are a crucial part of your training. Thus before
consulting others make sure you have made a genuine effort to solve problems the
problems yourself. You are encouraged to discuss how to solve particular
problems with your group. Cooperation on homework is fine; furthermore, if you
explain to others how to solve a problem, it means you really understand the
physics of the problem.


Questions: Ask questions. Don’t worry about looking Dumb!
Most of your fellow students are probably having the same difficulties and
sometimes are afraid to ask questions. If you want your questions answered, ask
me at the lecture or write down any questions you may have and give them to me
or send them to me by e-mail (szverev@towson.edu). I will be most happy to
answer them.

Honesty Policy: In homework, you are expected to be able
to consult with classmates and friends. Needless to say, consultation is not
allowed on exams
. If there is evidence of cheating, you can expect to
receive a zero for that test. Depending on the seriousness of the offense, you
may be: (1) given an F for the course, (2) asked to drop the course, (3) be
carried through the University procedures for more serious sanctions**.

Tutorial: Academic Advising Center: https://www.towson.edu/academicadvising/. Tutoring Center: https://www.towson.edu/tutoring-learning/.
Useful
o
nline
math resource sites: Purple Math:  http://www.purplemath.com/
, S.O.S.
Mathematics: http://www.sosmath.com/index.html.

Office hours: Wednesday, 6:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. by appointment. I can also meet with you online via zoom: https://towson-edu.zoom.us/j/97330449734?pwd=VWVSUDhvbWdzNjN0ZEt6TnlwWHZpZz09
or

Meeting ID: 973 3044 9734

Passcode: 27794388

Examinations: there will be three Hour Examinations and a
comprehensive (cumulative) Final Examination. These will contain concept and
mathematical questions similar to the homework problems. A formula sheet will
be provided for each exam. The exams will test your conceptual understanding of
physics as well as your problem solving abilities. Note that there will be no
make-up examinations. If notification of an unavoidable absence from an
examination (note from the Student Health Center or the family doctor, or from
the Athletic Department participation in University sports activity) is
given to the instructor prior to the examination, the weights of the remaining
examinations will be readjusted.

Final Examination: Wednesday, December 15th, 2021 (7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.)

STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES:

This course is in compliance with Towson University policies for students with disabilities. Students with disabilities are encouraged to register with Disability Support Services (DSS), 7720 York Road, Suite 232, 410/704-2638 (Voice or TDD). Students who suspect that they have a disability but do not have documentation are encouraged to contact DSS for advice on how to obtain appropriate evaluation. A memo from DSS authorizing your accommodation is needed before any accommodation can be made.

DIVERSITY MISSION STATEMENT:

The Department of Physics, Astronomy and Geosciences (PAGS), in accordance with the Fisher College of Science and Mathematics (FCSM) and with the Towson University Strategic Plan, support initiatives that promote diversity among FCSM faculty, staff and students. We are committed to increasing the quality and diversity of our students, faculty and staff while increasing retention and curriculum initiatives. To obtain further information related to diversity initiatives, please visit https://www.towson.edu/studentdiversity/.

Criteria for Grading:






1. 1st Hour Examination

16

2. 2nd Hour Examination

16

3. 3rd Hour Examination

16

4. Laboratory

26

6. Final Examination

26

Grading Scale:




Letter grade

A

A-

B+

B

B-

C+

C

D+

D

F

Total points

100-91 90-89 88-86 85-81 80-78 77-75 74-64 63-60 59-50 49-0

The grades will be posted on the Blackboard: exam grades in poins on the scale 1 – 16 for hour examinations and on the scale 0 – 26 for the final exam; lab grades on the scale 0 – 100% for each lab. At the and of the semester the final percentage lab grade will be converted to points on the scale 0 – 26. Then the poins for all exams and the lab will be added and the grading scale will be applied to the total number of poins to determine the letter grade for the course.


If you have a problem with any aspect of the course, please
feel free to e-mail me. Feedback on the course
is welcome at anytime. I look forward to working with you and hope that despine the pandemic the semester
is a good one for us all.

 


Reading/Examination Schedule (subject
to change)

















Week 1 Sept. 1 Introduction, One-Dimensional Motion Chapters 1, 2
Week 2 Sept. 8 Vectors Chapter 3
Week 3 Sept. 15 Projectile motion. Chapter 3
Week 4 Sept. 22 Force and Motion. Exam Review Chapter 4
Week 5 Sept. 29 Exam I. Force and Motion. Chapter 4
Week 6 Oct. 6 Work and Energy. Chapter 5
Week 7 Oct. 13 Linear Momentum and Collisions. Chapter 6
Week 8 Oct. 20 Circular Motion and Gravitation. Exam Review Chapter 7
Week 9 Oct. 27 Exam II. Circular Motion and Gravitation Chapter 7
Week 10 Nov. 3 Rotational Motion Chapter 8
Week 11 Nov. 10 Rotational Motion Chapter 8
Week 12 Nov. 17 Solids and Fluids. Exam Review Chapter 9
Week 13 Nov. 24 Thanksgiving  
Week 14 Dec. 1 Exam III. Solids and Fluids Chapter 9
Week 15 Dec. 8 Temperature and Kinetic Theory. Exam Review Chapter 10
Week 16 Dec. 15 Final Exam  

Lab Schedule (subject to change)


















Lab 101 Lab 102
Week 1 Aug.30 (no lab) Aug.31 (no lab)
Week 2 Sep.6 (Labor Day) Sep.7 (LAB1 )
Week 3 Sep.13 (LAB2 ) Sep.14 (LAB2 )
Week 4 Sep. 20 (LAB3) Sep. 21 (LAB3)
Week 5 Sep.27 (review) Sep.28 (review)
Week 6 Oct. 4 (LAB4) Oct. 5 (LAB4)
Week 7 Oct.11 (LAB5) Oct.12 (LAB5)
Week 8 Oct.18 (LAB6) Oct.19(LAB6)
Week 9 Oct.25 (review) Oct.26 (review)
Week 10 Nov.1 (LAB7) Nov.2 (LAB7)
Week 11 Nov. 8 (LAB8) Nov. 9 (LAB8)
Week 12 Nov.15 (LAB9) Nov.16 (LAB9)
Week 13 Nov.22  (review) Nov.23  (review)
Week 14 Nov.29 (LAB10) Nov.30 (LAB10)
Week 15 Dec. 6 (Moment of Inertia)  Dec. 7 (Moment of Inertia)
Week 16 Dec.13 (TBD) no lab

LAB1 Basic measurements and excel tutorials

LAB2 Relating position, velocity and acceleration

LAB3 Acceleration and Free fall

LAB4 Projectile motion

LAB5 Newton’s 2nd law

LAB6 Traction and equilibrium

LAB7 Work and energy

LAB8 Contact friction

Lab 9   Centripetal motion

LAB10 Muscles, torque, and T-Rex

LAN    Moment of inertia

 


Homework and Exercises7th edition (6th edition) – subject to change













Chapter

Homework Problems (Exercises)

 Recommended Examples

1

 ##
8 (25), 9 (26), 10 (27), 13 (29), 21 (47), 23 (49), 29 (53), 41 (71), 46 (75), 48 (77)
 

2

 ## 4 (13), 6 (15), 11 (19), 13 (21), 15 (25), 24 (41), 34 (51), 37 (54), 41 (65), 47 (71),

51 (75), 65 (97)
 2.2, 2.3, 2.7, 2.9

3

 ## 1 (4), 2 (7), 5 (10), 8 (13), 12 (17), 19 (31), 30 (41), 44 (61), 46 (63), 52 (69), 69 (95)
 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.5

4

3 on p.131 (3), 7 and 11on p.132 (#24 and #48), ## 3 (15), 5 (16), 8 (19), 19 (37),

25 (41), 38 (61), 41 (67), 65 (97), 66 (99), 68 (101), 76 (107)
 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.10

5

2 on p.173 (#6), 6 on p. 173 (23), ## 2 (9), 12 (17), 17 (25), 19 (27), 25 (33), 31 (47),

35 (51), 38 (59), 45 (72), 53 (81)
 5.3, 5.4, 5.5, 5.9, 5.14

6

## 3 (9), 6 (13), 11 (17), 16 (23), 20 (33), 21 (34), 28 (42), 37 (55), 45 (62), 51 (68)  6.1, 6.3, 6.4, 6.6

7

## 19 (28), 22 (31), 24 (33), 31 (47), 33 (49), 37 (53), 45 (67), 47 (69), 55 (83), 58 (85)  7.3, 7.4, 7.5, 7.8, 7.10, 7.13

8

 ## 9 (25), 13 (29), 22 (37), 35 (59), 37 (62), 42 (69)  8.2, 8.6, 8.12

9

## 22 (37), 26 (39), 31 (45), 44 (67), 46 (69)  9.9, 9.10

10

## 7 (13), 20 (33), 24 (35), 26 (39), 57 (79), 67 (94)  10.3, 10.4, 10.8

11

## 7 (15),  9 (18), 14 (21), 30 (41), 28 (43)  11.3, 11.4, 11.5

For some even problems answers click here.

 


View more information: https://tigerweb.towson.edu/zverev/syllabus2006.htm

See more articles in category: Best
READ:  When You Read Something That Strikes You as Interesting, You Should Write to the Author.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button